Here's What They're Saying About
BUDDY'S BRASS SHOP

 "Buddy has worked on my Bach & Schilke trumpets; as well as other students and pro horns with the utmost care and respect for the instruments he works on. Highly recommended."

- Doug Mendocha
Private Teacher & Performer

"Thanks for getting my horns back in shape so quickly. You're the best!"

- Mike Carubia
Ward Melville High School

"During the past 40 years I can count on one hand the number of professional brass repair technicians I've entrusted my own horns to: 1 in NYC, 1 in New Mexico (formerly in L.A.), 1 in Virginia and, 1 in Boston. And then, there's Long Island's very own, Buddy Merriam. Don't forget to add Buddy Merriam to your list! Buddy embodies everything you look for in a professional repair technician: years of experience, master skills, meticulous attention to detail, fair prices and, above all else: he's one heck of a nice guy! P.S. He's an incredibly awesome mandolin player, too! Buddy is just amazing!”
Thomas Gellert- Music Educator

"As a professional horn player and the owner of many high quality and expensive french horns, I have found Buddy's Brass to be invaluable for the maintenance and repair of these fine instruments. Buddy has been so accommodating and professional to work with plus very exacting in his repairs. I have sent all my students to him through the years and have never heard anything but complements from everyone.  I feel fortunate to have a repairman of his quality in Suffolk County. "On time, reasonable & friendly. Buddy's Brass Shop is always a winner."

- Nancy Bennett
Music Educator, Private Teacher & Performer

"Buddy is the best brass repairman on Long Island and the only one I recommend."

- Craig Lindsay
Lindsay Music

"On time, reasonable & friendly. Buddy's Brass Shop is always a winner"   

- John Weavers
Copaigue High School Band,
NYS Champions 2002

"Highest quality, competitive prices, is personal and accommodating and a pleasure to work with."

- David Minelli
Shoreham-Wading River High School

Click here to read more!

www.buddysbrass.net/edit

Ultrasonic Cleaning

 

 

 

Sound Advice for Trumpet Players

Store mouthpiece in designated slot in case

 

Open water key and blow through instrument to

remove water – especially after playing

 

Move all 4 slides back and forth and grease tuning slides  periodically to prevent sticking

 

Oil valves as needed (only 2-3 drops)

      

If mouthpiece gets stuck bring to your music

teacher –NEVER remove any stuck object with

pliers       

 

Tiny dents in the valve casings can cause your valves not to move

       

Wash your mouthpiece with a mouthpiece brush

in lukewarm water and soap as needed

       

Make sure you set your trumpet down with the

2nd valve slide pointing up to help prevent the 2nd valve from sticking

      

Do NOT eat or drink before or while you play

       

Send in once a year for ultrasonic cleaning & maintenance

 

 

~REPAIR TIP~

   French Horn Stringing...It is important to remember when stringing a rotor valve; that the strings do not touch; as that increases wear and binding up etc. They may work, despite this, but, try to have them NOT touch; sometimes you can achieve this by bending the angled, strung arm up or down. On occasion, you have to bend the arm toward or away from the stop arm. We call this,. “string over” or “string under” as to where the strings wind up.


      A very necessary skill for the complete brass player is the ability to string your own rotary valves. Whether done backstage as an emergency repair right before a performance or as preventative maintenance after a serious cleaning session, being able to confidently restring your valves can save a lot of stress, headaches, and money.
You will need the following supplies:

A small screwdriver (check the screws on your valves: slotted or Phillips)
A pair of sharp scissors
Some Fly Line Backing (Braided Nylon, approx. 50 lb. wt.)
A cigarette lighter
optional: a french horn stringing jig
optional: two popsicle sticks & tape

      If you would like to keep the spatulas aligned (the same height when up) use a french horn stringing jig, or place one popsicle stick on the spatulas where your fingertips usually rest and another beneath it on the other side of the spatulas. Secure together with tape.
      A rotary valve has several small screws. Be very careful loosening these screws: they can be very hard to replace if lost, and often pulling on the string somewhere else can loosen the screw more than you expected. First loosen the two string screws and remove the old string.
      Cut a 5- or 6-inch piece of Fly Line Backing (the string). Seal each end of the fishing line by lighting it and then pinching the end to melt the strands together. (Please note: if you are using a blended fiber or actual string, this usually will not work.) This insures that the fishing line will not fray, become thin and/or break.
      Next, tie a knot in one end. While any knot bigger than the string hole will work, I recommend utilizing a figure-8 knot. To tie a figure-8 knot, loop the string over then back under (see Fig. 1, Fig. 2). Next, pass the string through the first loop (see Fig. 3) and pull tight (see Fig. 4). A figure-8 knot constantly pulls itself tighter and is least likely to become undone.
      A very necessary skill for the complete brass player is the ability to string your own rotary valves. Whether done backstage as an emergency repair right before a performance or as preventative maintenance after a serious cleaning session, being able to confidently restring your valves can save a lot of stress, headaches, and money.
You will need the following supplies:

      Spin the stop arm up into position and hold it in place with your thumb. Spin it towards the end of the spatula.
      Insert the untied end of the string into the string hole opposite the valve and pull through towards the valve. Send the string up between the spatula and and the rotor stop arm. Loop it around the cylinder, down between the string screw and the rotor retaining screw, and around the string screw. Pass the string around the cylinder and pull it tight. Carefully tighten the string screw on the stop arm with your screwdriver. You do not need to knot the string as the screw will hold it in place.

       Next, pass the string under itself and back through the spatula string hole near the end. Passing the string under itself helps keep the string from rolling off the cylinder.

       Once through the string hole, loop the string around the string screw and pull snug. Use your screwdriver to tighten the string screw and hold the string tight. Again, no knot is necessary as the screw will hold it in place. Trim off the excess (not too short, this will make it hard to re-tie if necessary) and seal the end with the lighter. Finally, check your valve to make sure it moves freely and you're done!




      

      Spin the stop arm up into position and hold it in place with your thumb. Spin it towards the end of the spatula.
      Insert the untied end of the string into the string hole opposite the valve and pull through towards the valve. Send the string up between the spatula and and the rotor stop arm. Loop it around the cylinder, down between the string screw and the rotor retaining screw, and around the string screw. Pass the string around the cylinder and pull it tight. Carefully tighten the string screw on the stop arm with your screwdriver. You do not need to knot the string as the screw will hold it in place.

       Next, pass the string under itself and back through the spatula string hole near the end. Passing the string under itself helps keep the string from rolling off the cylinder.

       Once through the string hole, loop the string around the string screw and pull snug. Use your screwdriver to tighten the string screw and hold the string tight. Again, no knot is necessary as the screw will hold it in place. Trim off the excess (not too short, this will make it hard to re-tie if necessary) and seal the end with the lighter. Finally, check your valve to make sure it moves freely and you're done!


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